Nuclear Power Plant Isar, Germany

Spent nuclear fuel pool

Turbine of a nuclear plant

Radioactivity

Antoine-Henri Becquerel

Antoine-Henri Becquerel

Antoine-Henri Becquerel studied at the Polytechnic School. In 1875 he entered the department of bridges and roads, and became chief engineer in 1894. In 1892 he succeeded his father in the chair of the Museum of Natural History, and in 1895 he became professor of the Polytechnic School.

He continued his father's studies, and the discovery of X-rays by Röntgen (1896) made Antoine-Henri Becquerel think that this new radiation could be related to fluorescence and phosphorescence.

Henri Becquerel He also studied the polarization and absorption of light in crystals.

Finally,…

+ info

Radioactivity

Radioactivity

We define radioactivity as the spontaneous emission of particles (alpha particles, beta particles, neutrons) or radiations (range, K capture), or both at the same time, coming from the disintegration of certain nuclides that form them, due to an arrangement in its internal structure.

Radioactive decay occurs in unstable atomic nuclei, that is, those that do not have enough binding energy to keep the nucleus together due to an excess of protons or neutrons.

Radioactivity can be natural or artificial. In natural radioactivity, the substance already has it in the natural state. In…

+ info

Radionuclide

Radionuclide

A radioactive nuclide, radionuclide or radionuclide is an unstable nuclide and therefore degenerates emitting ionizing radiation. Although some physicists sometimes use the word radioisotope vulgarly to designate it, it should be noted that the strict or formal language of the physics and technology of nuclear energy is wrong, since a nuclide and an isotope are not the same.

When a radionuclide emits radioactivity it reaches a more stable state, which requires less energy than before and, in general, transforms into another different…

+ info

History of Nuclear Energy

History of Nuclear Energy

To explain the history of nuclear energy we could distinguish three major stages:

  • Physical and chemical scientific studies of the elements.
  • The development of the nuclear bomb during World War II.
  • Use of nuclear energy in the civil field.

Scientific studies cover this whole period since the first Greek philosophers began to define atoms, until the development of the first nuclear bomb. In this process, different scientists discover the presence of electrons, neutrons and protons and properties that make one atom more radioactive than another.

+ info

Nuclear power station of Vandellós II

Nuclear power station of Vandellós II

The Vandellós II nuclear power plant is a power plant. The facility is located on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea, in the municipality of Vandellós, in the province of Tarragona. The national participation in the construction and supply of equipment represented more than 89% of the total, which represented the highest percentage achieved in Spain for this type of project.

The plant as a whole, which has a nuclear pressurized water reactor, consists of several main buildings: containment building, fuel, auxiliary and turbine building. In addition, it is equipped with…

+ info

Nuclear waste storage

Nuclear waste storage

The storage of nuclear waste of low and medium activity is based on the interposition of natural and artificial barriers between said nuclear waste and the environment, so that they are perfectly isolated for the time necessary until their radioactivity decays to harmless levels. 

The storage of radioactive waste of low and medium activity is carried out in facilities prepared for it. Most of the waste is cleaning rags, filters and impurities of circuits, ion exchange resins, pieces of facilities, etc., coming from nuclear power plants. Also stored are gloves, syringes,…

+ info

Nuclear Power in Chile

Nuclear Power in Chile

During the 70s and 80s Chile was in the process of modernizing the electric sector. During these years Chile liberalized its economy, privatized utility companies and opened the electricity sector to foreign investors.

During this time, however, Chile did not initiate any nuclear energy program unlike Argentina and Brazil. Chile did not seem willing to consider a nuclear energy option. Even in 2005, the future president Michelle Bachelet did not want to incorporate the development of nuclear energy as a valid option as part of her national energy policy.

Subsequently,…

+ info

Nuclear Accident In Fukushima, Japan

Nuclear Accident In Fukushima, Japan

The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident is a series of incidents, including four separate explosions, that took place at the Naraha nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, following the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami on March 11. 2011. The Fukushima nuclear facility was a nuclear power plant to convert nuclear energy into electrical energy.

The Fukushima nuclear disaster occurred on March 11, 2011. It is the most serious nuclear accident in history after the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

The accident was caused by an 8.9-degree earthquake near the northwest coast of…

+ info